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Brits in Bermuda(s)


Bermuda is situated at a distance of 570 miles (917 kilometers) from Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. With a surface of just fifty-five square kilometers, Bermuda sits atop a long extinct volcanic surrounded by turquoise water that touches upon its pink-sand beaches.  more...


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Bermuda is situated at a distance of 570 miles (917 kilometers) from Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. With a surface of just fifty-five square kilometers, Bermuda sits atop a long extinct volcanic surrounded by turquoise water that touches upon its pink-sand beaches.

Though strictly not a Caribbean Island, Bermudaís identity is definitely linked to the Caribbean thanks to the fact that many of the black people of Bermuda can trace part of their ancestry to great-grandparents who migrated there from St. Kitts & Nevis (which are in the Eastern Caribbean) early in the 20th century.

Bermuda obtained its name from the Spanish sea captain Juan de Bermudez who sited the island around 1503. At this time the Indians inhabited Bermuda, like every island or country in the Western Hemisphere. The Spanish did not claim Bermuda as they did not feel it had anything to offer, and, as it is surrounded by dangerous reefs, they had encountered numerous nautical misadventures, which had littered the sea bed with enough treasure to become interested in scuba diving for more than a recreational sport.

While the African people have given Bermuda itís Caribbean feel, rhythm, music and connection, it is without a doubt the English culture that is and has been dominant in daily life of the Bermudians. Everything you can think of, from the English language spoken in Bermuda to sports such as cricket and the wigs worn by the judges in Bermudaís courtrooms, make Bermuda feel undeniably British. One main reason for this unique identity is that Bermuda never transferred political power since the British colonized it. During the colonization, the middle class British population who opted to come over to the sub tropical climate of Bermuda, has outdone itself to turn the territory into a piece of middle class Britain.

Bermuda is in many ways rather conservative. Nude or topless beaches are hard to find and the protestant or Anglican religion is adopted by large parts of the populations, including the people of African decent. Many women on the island still wear stockings and heels, while the men wear jackets and ties both during the day and at night. Another famous piece of clothing are the Bermuda shorts, which are worn by Bermudian businessman as soon as the weather allows, usually around May. The Bermuda shorts became very popular in the 1920ís and 30ís after British soldiers who used them in India introduced into Bermudian society.

Traditionally speaking, the British do not have the strongest reputation when it comes to food. One of the most common elements found in Bermudian cuisine is fish, which is eaten at almost any meal of the day. Dishes like fish chowder and pan-fried fish are traditional fare served on the island. Other dishes that are commonly served on the island include cassava pie, mussel pie, and delicious Bermudian desserts like loquat and bananas baked in rum and brown sugar.

Although many colonies have opted to become independent from Britain, Bermuda choose to stay is a self governing dependency of Britain, which protects the Islands security and a governor who is appointed by the Queen. Anglophiles may find themselves right at home in Bermuda though may grudge over the fact that these days Bermuda depends heavily on the United States for many of its essential imports, a reality that is conveniently forgotten by the first sight of a Bermudian Bobbie directing the traffic or joining an elated crowd at a cricket match.

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